March 2011

On March 14 a double-CD of the music from the ballet The Most Incredible Thing is released under the name Tennant/Lowe. It contains the full performance score of the ballet with orchestrations by Sven Helbig.

March 2011

On March 17 the ballet The Most Incredible Thing has its first public performance at Sadler’s Wells Theatre in London. Its genesis can be traced back to a week in where, by chance, two initially unrelated events took place. Ivan Putrov, a principal dancer at the Royal Ballet whom the Pet Shop Boys had got to know through Sam Taylor-Wood, called Neil to ask whether they would write a piece for him to dance to. Two days later, before Neil had even had a chance to ask Chris, Chris called to say that he’d just read a story in a new translation of Hans Christian Andersen’s tales that he thought would make a great ballet: “The Most Incredible Thing”. This eventually led to the Sadler’s Wells production, choreographed by Javier de Frutos and starring Ivan Putrov, Clemmie Sveaas and Aaron Sillis. All ten performances sell out.

May 2011

On May 27 the Pet Shop Boys appear at the Sunderland Stadium of Light, joining Take That at their invitation as “special guests” on their first reunion concerts as a five-piece on what will be the biggest British tour ever – 29 British stadium shows – followed by a short European leg. “45 minutes of intensity,” says Chris.

December 2011

On December 31 the Pet Shop Boys appear at a New Year’s Eve concert on an island in Sydney Harbour.

On This Day

2000

The Pet Shop Boys perform the first of two consecutive nights' concerts in Osaka, Japan.

2002

The Release Tour comes to Athens, Greece.

2009

The Boys bring their Pandemonium Tour to London's O2 Arena—a sold-out performance. After the concert, they host a small party for family and friends, including a number of celebrities. Neil is especially pleased to find that his eight-year-old nephew enjoyed the show.

2011

The second of two PSB/Take That shows in Dublin.

2013

The British Film Institute in London screens the classic silent film Battleship Potemkin, accompanied by the recorded Tennant-Lowe score from 2004—the first public screening of the film with their score in a cinematic venue. Neil puts in an appearance to provide a brief introduction.

Next (2012)